How I make bone broth

I make bone broth on a routine basis because we eat a lot of pasture-raised organic chicken and there’s NO WAY I’m letting those precious drippins and bones go to waste!

Also, bone broth is an old, trusted friend of mine.
Its nutrient, gelatin and collagen content is the reason I recommend it to my clients suffering from pelvic organ prolapse, chronic inflammation and joint pain, gut dysbiosis and a history of restrictive (under-eating) and malnourishment as well as my pregnant and postpartum mommas!

Five years ago when I was SUPER sick with three parasites and Candida overgrowth, my body couldn’t tolerate many foods.

I was malnourished and had horrible stomach pains more often than not.

I had heard of bone broth and it’s ability to sooth and heal/seal the gut, so I decided to give it a shot.
It sounded warm, soothing and easy to digest, so why not?


I can still remember breathing a sigh of relief when I drank my first mug.
The salty, nutritious goodness of gelatin, collagen, and amino acids from the chicken meat and bones PLUS the vitamins and minerals from the veggies I had used, it was bringing me back to life.

Finally I had something that I could consistency eat that didn’t make me feel terrible.
PLUS it was also sealing my leaky gut, helping me heal a bit.
It was giving me nutrition at a time when I was struggling to eat enough food to sustain my body and had dysbiosis that mades it difficult to sufficiently extract nutrients from the food that I was eating.


“Good broth will resurrect the dead,” - South American proverb.




We easily eat a roasted chicken once or twice a week so I pop the bones, carcass and drippings in a ziplock bag and throw them in the freezer.
I typically wait until I have two birds worth of bones before I made a broth.

Even when I have grass-fed beef bones, I STILL make add in the chicken.
Beef broth is a lot of nutrient bang for your buck, but chicken broth has a milder taste, so mixing the two is my preferred broth.


If I make the combo, then I start the roasted beef bones FIRST for 12 hours and then add in the chicken.
Chicken doesn’t need as long of a cook time as the beef bones do, and I don’t love the flavor of a bone broth that’s been cooked for too long.

Ok, so here are my super simple directions for making bone broth.

Stephanie Gadreau of Stupid Easy Paleo has recipe for making it in the Instant Pot.

I don’t go that route, but if you’re into your Instant Pot, then try that version!




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Chicken Bone Broth Instructions (not a recipe) -easiest done on the weekend if you work a traditional work schedule, since you have to monitor it for 24 hours.

1. Take two-three chickens worth of bones (I usually have them frozen from previous meals) and pour 1/4 cup of Braggs Apple Cider Vinegar or lemon juice on the bones and let sit for 5 minutes.



2. Cover the bones with filtered or spring water (fluoride and chlorine-free if possible, but do what you can, #persistenceoverperfection!)


3. Bring water to boil.


4. Throw in 1-2 organic onions (whole is fine) and 2-3 cloves of garlic.


5. Add in any other veggie scraps that you have hanging around! I frequently use celery stalks or hearts, carrots, or sweet potatoes. I do not respond well to nightshades, so no potatoes, peppers, tomatoes or eggplant.

6. Allow to continue to boil with the veggies for 5 minutes, then reduce to a simmer. You can transfer to a pre-heated crockpot if you feel safer, but I leave mine on the stove, because I live on the edge. **Making sure there is nothing flammable nearby.

7. Simmer broth for 20 hours (anything between 12 and 20 is fine, but I like to check the bones and make sure they are easily crushable before taking the broth off the heat). Keep an eye on the water level and add more water when necessary. I top it off before I go to bed.

8. Don’t add any water (unless absolutely necessary) in the last 5 hours because it dilutes your rich broth.

9. Turn off the heat and let broth cool a bit.

10. Strain veggies and bones! I use something like this to scoop out the bones and veggies, DO NOT THROW THEM OUT!

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If you miss a few bones, it’s not the end of the world, IF you checked to make sure the bones were easily crushable and not choking hazards.



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11. I freeze extra broth-or broth I don’t want to use immediately, in bags and distribute the rest into jars.
It’s best to divide it up according to how much you will use in one sitting.
When the broth cools, if you included skin or gelatinous fat from when you cooked the bird, a layer of fat will form on the top. This will ESPECIALLY happen if you included beef bones.
The fat layer helps keeps the bone broth by sealing out bacteria, so leave it on there!

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Sarah Smith is a personal trainer, level two Russian  Kettlebell Instructor, postnatal fitness specialist and pelvic floor and gut health advocate working online and in Raleigh, North Carolina. 
She specializes in helping women online and in-person feel strong, confident and capable in their bodies!

Sarah is a mom to three boys and one English Bulldog. She loves soil, coffee and not folding laundry. 

Why I created Kettlebells For Cool Kids and why YOU should do it!

1. People need access to more kettlebell training that doesn’t just whip them into shape, but ensures longevity and enjoyment in their fitness practice (aka doesn’t hurt them).

From breathing patterns to pelvic position, core muscle development and alignment, WOMEN ESPECIALLY need education and support on how to train SMART to prevent weakening or over-training their cores and pelvic floors.

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Healing the gut with movement and exercise to STOP chronic disease

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Due to their positive effects on clearing inflammation in the body and improving the health and diversity of the gut microbiome, movement and exercise are recommended as some of the most effective tools for healing and reducing the risk of chronic disease.

But in this case, NOT all forms of exercise are beneficial to everyone!
SOME forms of fitness will actually:

  • INCREASE the body’s stress response
  • create inflammation
  • cause leaky gut syndrome and consequently, associated health conditions, you will learn them soon.
     

So let's talk about:

  1. Inflammation, what it is, why it's problematic and what causes it.
  2. How the nervous system AND gut play a role in creating and clearing inflammation.
  3. How movement and exercise INCREASES the health and diversity of the gut microbiome, BUT also has the potential to harm it and why that matters for chronic disease.
  4. What forms of fitness are BEST for beginners and those struggling with chronic disease and how probiotics can also help!

 

I feel very strongly about this topic and feel that it's important for you to know that all the claims I'm about to make are supported by the peer-reviewed literature.
But if learning about that is NOT your jam, you can skip to the summary at the bottom. 
It won't hurt my feelings. 
Here we go!


What is inflammation? 

 Image credit: Innovation Toronto. 

Image credit: Innovation Toronto. 

  • Acute inflammation is a natural, healthy immune response that helps your body heal.
     
  • Chronic inflammation is associated with many modern diseases, including obesity, diabetes, Alzheimers, coronary heart disease, coronary artery disease, cancer, chronic fatigue, inflammatory bowel disease, fatigue and a whole host of other conditions! (Harvard Health, 2006)
     
  • Chronic inflammation occurs when the body creates an inflammatory response to a non-specific, perceived threat.
    “The white blood cells swarm, but have nothing to do and nowhere to go, and they sometimes eventually start attacking internal organs or other necessary tissues and cells”. -Dr. Scott Walker, Gunnison Valley Hospital in Utah.
     
  • Chronic inflammation negatively impacts the central nervous system whose job it is to help clear inflammation. When left unchecked, the sympathetic nervous system has to work overtime, all of the time, which leads to high blood pressure, insulin resistance, muscle and body wasting, and cardiovascular mortality (Pongratz and Straub, 2014)
  • When chronic inflammation is suspected, doctors can test for C-reactive protein levels (CRP), which increase when the body is inflamed.
     
  • Gut distress and chronic inflammation are related for a number of reasons, largely the gut is home to the enteric nervous system AND 80%  of the immune system.

What are common signs of chronic inflammation:

1. Lots of belly fat-I’m not talking gentle relaxed, soft bellies here-which I love (folks are too obsessed with six-pack abs), but rather growing fat storage around the middle.

2. High blood glucose levels-blood sugar imbalances, loss of insulin sensitivity.

3. Digestive problems like gas, diarrhea, bloating, or constipation.

4. Chronic fatigue or exhaustion.

5. Skin problems like eczema or psoriasis, or your skin is red and blotchy.

6. Allergies.

7. Puffy face, or puffy bags under your eyes.

8. Gum disease-see Dr. Lin’s The Dental Diet-FASCINATING!

9. Depression, anxiety, brain fog

10. Erectile dysfunction in men, pelvic floor dysfunction in both men and women.

 

The gut and its relationship to inflammation


One extremely common source of inflammation that is being linked to more and more chronic health conditions  (diabetes, cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, PCOS, autism and more!) is gut dysbiosis (imbalance of good and bad microbes) of the gut leading to erosion of the mucosal lining of your gut, aka-leaky gut syndrome. 

The intestinal epithelium is the largest mucosal surface in the body.

 OralWellness.com

OralWellness.com

It is the barrier between the rest of the body and the food, fluid and air that comes in from the external environment.

This barrier’s job is to be selective about what it allows to pass through into the blood stream and internal environment of the the body. 

 Image credit: goodfoodeating.com

Image credit: goodfoodeating.com

When the epithelium is compromised by toxins in your environment AND food, stress, gut irritants, antibiotics that kill good bacteria, other pharmaceutical drugs, pathogens, etc.,  it erodes (leaky gut syndrome) which allows toxins, food particles, etc. get into the blood.

These toxins and food particles (that often look much like our own proteins) can be attacked by the immune system causing a chronic immune and inflammatory response in the body, like food sensitivities and eventually the many chronic diseases filed under autoimmunity. 

Our gut microbes are also in strong communication with our nervous system.

In 2017, Zhu et. al., reported that ,

“Disorders in the composition and quantity of gut microorganisms can affect both the enteric nervous system and the central nervous system (CNS), thereby indicating the existence of a microbiota-gut-brain axis. Due to the intricate interactions between the gut and the brain, gut symbiotic microorganisms are closely associated with various CNS diseases.”

The microbes living in our gut talk directly with our nerve cells to control the brain and it's response to NUMEROUS stimuli. 

Since the gut, immune system and nervous system are intimately involved in mediating chronic inflammation and also profoundly effected by fitness and exercise, let's talk about the how to use fitness training to HEAL and nourish the body WITHOUT pissing off the immune and nervous system, shall we?
 

Movement and Exercise Piece



Research shows that the health of the gut AND reduction of the inflammatory response can be improved with certain types of routine movement and exercise.

American adults who engaged in frequent physical activity are better able to clear inflammation than adults who live a more sedentary life.

 Kettlecise 

Kettlecise 

For example, a 2010 study with eighty-two patients found that in type 2 diabetics, (key term coming up) long-term high intensity resistance and aerobic training reduced inflammatory markers over the course of a year (independent of changes in body weight, meaning activity was the key factor). (Balducci et al, 2010

Numerous studies have shown that sedentary individuals have a different gut microbiome than active ones (Allen et. al., 2017, Cronin 2017) and that routine exercise modifies the composition of the gut microbiome creating significant differences in the community of microbes of active individuals vs. sedentary. 

In fact, Bressa et al. 2017 found a significant correlation between the presence of specific species of microbes, fat-loss, body composition, and physical activity!

This means that there are certain microbes that live in the guts of leaner more active individuals AND that by growing our daily movement practices we can affect what bugs are there AND increase the diversity of the microbial community that lives in us and helps us maintain our health!
 

But what kind of exercise is best for the gut?

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This seems to vary somewhat with the individual.

For example, a highly trained athlete or individual with lots of exercise experience is better able to recover from the stress of high intensity and strenuous exercise. They can routinely attend Crossfit, HIIT, participate in Triathlons and providing they consume enough nutrition and take time to recover, they will not experience negative health effects.

A beginner, on the other hand, someone that has historically been sedentary, individuals with over-taxed immune or adrenal system and leaky gut, or is sporadically consistent with exercise, will not respond well to fitness that is too intense and does not allow for adequate recovery time. (Barton, 2017)


These folks are better off turning to more from moderately challenging exercise like weight training, movement and mobility training and routine walking. 

If they desire to be able to engage in high intensity fitness classes like HIIT, Crossfit or Metabolic Conditioning, then they should TRAIN for that slowly and give themselves adequate time to recover between intervals AND workouts. 
 

You see,  strenuous (relative to the individual) exercise diverts blood flow away from the gut and can increase leakiness of the gut lining, immune system activation, stress the kidneys and other forms of stress on the body. (Clark and Mach, 2016).

Unfortunately, the popularity of high intensity fitness classes for beginners or individuals that have been sporadic in their exercise practice or are already struggling with chronic inflammations can be counterproductive and harmful. 

While initially folks will perhaps see an initial drop in pounds, this is often followed by a strong inflammatory stress response that leaves them susceptible to injury, fatigue, and experiencing STRONG cravings, gut distress and a frustrating lack of physique change.

If you struggle with symptoms of leaky gut syndrome (food intolerances, irritable bowel syndrome, etc.) then you are going to want to be vigilant about your workout intensity AND recovery time. Prioritize STRENGTH training to increase your fitness and gradually work to improve your conditioning and cut down on your recovery time. 


To see an example of a training program appropriate for someone that wishes to build strength, increase their fitness, and improve their metabolic flexibility WITHOUT stressing their body, get my gut-nourishing Strong Guts and Butts Movement Protocol here

 

Using probiotics to aid recovery and fitness

While exercise has been shown to improve the health of the gut, probiotic supplements and probiotic foods are ALSO important for recovery and health!

Intestinal microbes reduce oxidative stress and inflammation. Individuals with a more diversely populated gut are better able to recover from exercise and manage stress.

 

Research is now being conducted on how the use of probiotics (good bugs for your gut) and prebiotics (food for your good bugs) can be used therapeutically to aid athlete’s  nervous systems, mitigate their stress response, decrease inflammation and in some cases even avoid harmful conditions like exertion heat stroke! (Armstrong, 2018)

“Preliminary experimental data obtained from studies using probiotics and prebiotics studies show some interesting results, indicating that the microbiota acts like an endocrine organ (e.g. secreting serotonin, dopamine or other neurotransmitters) and may control the HPA axis [THIS IS YOUR CENTRAL NERVOUS RESPONSE] in athletes.” (Clark and Mach, 2016).

 

“In athletes, the administration of different Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium strains might help maintain a state of general health, enhance immune function, improve gut mucosal permeability, reduce oxidative stress and obtain energy from plant-carbohydrate sources.”  (Mach and Botella, 2016).

Summary time...

Movement and improved fitness are the keys to reducing your risk of developing or recovering from many chronic diseases because of its positive effect on the immune and nervous systems stress and inflammatory response.

The key is to choose the BEST forms of movement and training for your current state of health and fitness ability.

The lowest risk forms of training that will increase health and fitness are leisure walks, mobility and natural movement coupled with routine strength training.

Supplementation with probiotics and prebiotics is being shown in the literature to aid recovery and reduce inflammation because of it’s positive effects on the gut, nervous and immune systems. 

In short, if you are “out-of shape” or battling chronic disease, start walking, lift some heavy objects, move all of your body in all the plains, eat probiotic foods and give yourself adequate time to recover between training sessions.

Grab my MOVEMENT protocol, complete with daily natural movement training AND strength training!
 


 

Also, I read a ton of science to write this article. References below. 

 

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Sarah Smith is a personal trainer, level two Russian  Kettlebell Instructor, postnatal fitness specialist and pelvic floor and gut health advocate working online and in Raleigh, North Carolina. 
She specializes in helping women online and in-person feel strong, confident and capable in their bodies!

Sarah is a mom to three boys and one English Bulldog. She loves soil, coffee and not folding laundry. 
Check her out on social media
here or get on her email list!! for more content!

 

 

Allen, J.M. , L. J. Mailing, J. Cohrs, C. Salmonson, J. D. Fryer, V. Nehra, V. L. Hale, P. Kashyap, B. A. White & J. A. Woods (2017) Exercise training-induced modification of the gut microbiota persists after microbiota colonization and attenuates the response to chemically-induced colitis in gnotobiotic mice, Gut Microbes, 9:2, 115-130, DOI: 10.1080/19490976.2017.1372077

 

Armstrong LE, Lee EC, Armstrong EM. Interactions of Gut Microbiota, Endotoxemia, Immune Function, and Diet in Exertional Heatstroke. Journal of Sports Medicine. 2018;2018:5724575. doi:10.1155/2018/5724575.

 

Barton, Wiley & Penney, Nicholas & Cronin, Owen & Garcia-Perez, Isabel & G Molloy, Michael & Holmes, Elaine & Shanahan, Fergus & Cotter, Paul & O'Sullivan, Orla. (2017). The microbiome of professional athletes differs from that of more sedentary subjects in composition and particularly at the functional metabolic level. Gut. 67. 10.1136/gutjnl-2016-313627.

 

Barton, W. et al. The microbiome of professional athletes differs from that of more sedentary subjects in composition and particularly at the functional metabolic level. Gut, doi:10.1136/gutjnl-2016-313627 (2017).

Bilski J, Brzozowski B, Mazur-Bialy A, Sliwowski Z, Brzozowski T. The Role of Physical Exercise in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. BioMed Research International. 2014;2014:429031. doi:10.1155/2014/429031.

Bressa C, Bailén-Andrino M, Pérez-Santiago J, González-Soltero R, Pérez M, et al. (2017) Differences in gut microbiota profile between women with active lifestyle and sedentary women. PLOS ONE 12(2): e0171352. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0171352

 

Clark A, Mach N. Exercise-induced stress behavior, gut-microbiota-brain axis and diet: a systematic review for athletes. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. 2016;13:43. doi:10.1186/s12970-016-0155-6.

Cronin O, O'Sullivan O, Barton W, et al Gut microbiota: implications for sports and exercise medicine Br J Sports Med Published Online First: 11 January 2017. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2016-097225

Harvard Health Letter, Inflammation: A unifying theory of disease. April, 2006. (Link

Núria Mach, Dolors Fuster-Botella, Endurance exercise and gut microbiota: A review, Journal of Sport and Health Science,Volume 6, Issue 2,2017,

Zhu X, Han Y, Du J, Liu R, Jin K, Yi W. Microbiota-gut-brain axis and the central nervous system. Oncotarget. 2017;8(32):53829-53838. doi:10.18632/oncotarget.17754.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About that extra weight....

The majority of folks that I talk to these days believe they are carrying some extra weight. 

They will often even tell you exactly how much "extra" weight they are holding and often even what weight they are supposed to be. 

But the interesting thing here is that while THEY might believe that they are holding onto "extra" weight and their doctor or society might be telling them the same thing, their body has no idea what they are talking about. 

You see the body doesn't grow your fat cells, store more fat or more efficiently extract nutrition from food for no good reason. 
It does it because it believes that it NEEDS to. 

The information that you are sending it on a daily basis via your nutrition practices, your sleep, your movement habits...THIS is how it's gets ideas about what you need with respect to fat. 

For the human body FAT is a resource. 

I know that in our culture it's demonized because, yes, high percentages of fat storage in the body can cause some health problems and make it more difficult to lose weight.
Fat cells produce cytokines-which create inflammation/stress in the body  and fat cells also release estrogenwhich in high levels signals to the metabolism-"SLOW DOWN!" 

But fat itself is an amazingly beautiful resource. 
It's your body's,"Break glass in case of emergency" life-saving way to quickly provide you with energy and fuel IF you need it! 


And if your biology is responding to your lifestyle in a manner that communicates to your metabolism, "Things are bad here, we need more emergency resources!!" then all the diets and stressful exercise programs in the world are probably NOT going to work for you. 

In fact if you are age 35 or older, then you REALLY can't look to conventional weight loss programs.

Why? Because your body is stressed.It's inflamed. It's hormones are imbalanced and most importantly, its gut is not populated with the microbes that you need toONLY extract the calories that you NEED from food, the microbes that fight off organisms that make you crave sugar and lack energy,the bugs that help your body create dopamine and serotoninso that you feel GOOD!


Under-eating, cutting carbs, and stressing your body with long periods of exercise just ain't gonna cut it, because these strategies DON'T address the root issue. 

These approaches don't tell your body, "Hey-things are cool here, you can chill out and stop clinging to those fat cells like it's the end of the world."

So what DO YOU DO to alleviate the body's stress and help to balance it's hormones, metabolism and gut to get it to reduce holding onto unnecessary fat stores? 

Well I'll tell you!

 

  • Sleep
  • Move
  • Manage stress-not just emotional stress, PHYSICAL stress (we talk about this in the program!)
  • Heal the gut
  • Cut out toxic hormone-mimicking substances

If you do all of these things in an efficient manner that jives with your lifestyle, then your body is going to chill out. 
It's going to become more balanced and less stressed. 
It's going to let go of the "resources" it no longer needs. 


These are the strategies that I have used with over 100 women to help them feel more vibrant and confident in their bodies!
These are the strategies that I use in my own life to help keep my body balanced and minimally stressed!

And these are the strategies I will be introducing to you via my Get Up And Go With Your Gut Program!!!! 


Registration closes tomorrow, June 17th,but IONLY have a few spots left, so grab yours NOW!!! We start Monday, June 18th!!

Click the image below to learn more about this 4 week program to nourish your gut, alleviate digestion and consequently leave your body feeling more balanced and less stressed!!!

Fitness trends that negatively impact fat-loss goals by disrupting the gut and metabolism

Most of these actions can be really helpful at getting us results BUT many popular versions of these changes, negatively impact the metabolism by changing the landscape of the gut microbiome which results in digestive distress, increased appetite and weight gain. 

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